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Amateur bartenders unknowingly mix a “microbial brew.”

Doctors are warning against TikTok’s extremely viral “Sink Drink” trend, as it could lead to a bacterial infection.

For the uninitiated, this DIY alcohol technique involves mixing various drinks from sangria to horchata using the “MacGyver” principle in the kitchen sink—or even the bathroom—as seen in videos with millions of views.

In a tutorial with over 55 million views, influencer @realtipsybartender shows how he makes his signature drink “Jungle Juice” – vodka, Hawaiian Punch, lemonade, pink lemonade and citrus punch – right in his sink.

Unfortunately, these kitchen drinks have set off alarm bells among experts, who say they could essentially be a cesspool.


TikTok influencer The Tipsy Bartender shows how to make his famous “Jungle Juice” in the kitchen sink. TikTok / @realtipsybartender

“The kitchen sink is typically considered one of the riskiest places in the kitchen because it's where we dispose of cooked and uncooked food scraps and where we wash our hands after touching raw meat or other spilled liquids,” Dr. Gareth Nye, program manager for medical sciences, told British kitchen fitter Magnet Kitchens, according to Dextero.

This makes the sink an ideal breeding ground for E. coli and salmonella, he explained, adding: “Ultimately, you are using your sink to get rid of things and are likely to be exposed to millions of bacteria in and around the sink and drain.”


The tipsy bartender.
“The sink is typically considered one of the riskiest places in the kitchen because it is where we dispose of cooked and uncooked food scraps and where we wash our hands after touching raw meat or other spilled liquids,” said Dr. Gareth Nye, program director of medical sciences. TikTok / @realtipsybartender

Dr. Nye even cited a study by the National Sanitation Foundation that found that 45% of kitchen sinks harbor coliform bacteria such as E. coli, while 27% harbor mold, which is known to cause allergic reactions and respiratory problems.

This means that these amateur bartenders could accidentally create a salmonella splash.

Some experts even claim that the kitchen sink is dirtier than the toilet.

“In most cases, it's safer to make a salad on a toilet seat than on a cutting board,” Arizona microbiologist Dr. Charles Gerba (aka Dr. Germ) told Food & Wine magazine. “People are constantly disinfecting their toilet seats, but they don't realize they really need to be careful in the kitchen, too.”

As a result, according to Dr. Germ, there are more E. coli in a kitchen sink after flushing than in a toilet. He attributes this bacterial bouillabaisse to the moist environment and the food that people pour down the sink.

“Bacteria feed on the food scraps that people throw down the drain and the dishes in the sink,” he said. “That's probably why dogs drink from the toilet – because there are fewer E. coli bacteria there.”

In addition, drains in sinks are often clogged with grease or grease as well as a so-called biofilm, which, in addition to the bacteria already mentioned, can also harbor listeria, MRSA and legionnaires' bacteria.

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